Interesting article here on research into the standard of morals and how we can change our ideas about right and wrong.  When considering the outcome of the Banking Crisis how moral were the bankers, did they only think of personal gain?

Did they think about the people to whom they lent money for homes when interest rates were low, knowing that it was more than likely that when interest rates went up, the purchasers would be unable to pay the mortgage.  Was there any consideration for others who took loans and who may not have the training or understanding of money and finance.

So put yourself in the Bankers shoes; you are just a cog in the wheel and your department has been given targets  for selling home loans. You and your colleagues stand to get a decent pay rise, plus a great big fat bonus when the targets are met.  Does it matter that the people you lend to will get into a debt they can’t pay, then may lose their home?

It seems that a person with low moral standing can go along with immoral decisions when their peer group thinks what they are doing is OK, and they all do the same. A personal with high morals would have had to leave the company if the majority decided on the bonus at whatever cost!

Where would you be in the scenario? Would you be able to stand up for your moral ideals and try to persuade others to think your way,  or just go with the majority?

Money does funny things to people and when you already have a life style that could be so much better with more money, would you trade that in to hang on to your integrity?

Though not in the banking industry, I have been though that test and left the money behind; so I am not rich but I still have my integrity intact! That’s the way I like it, but maybe not for everyone. My personal happiness depends on knowing that I do what is right, not just for me but for everyone.

I you are having issues at work or in your private life that make you doubt your own integrity, call me and together we can make it right for you.

Diane, happiness is catching!